• If a member commits only a slight breach of order – such as addressing another member instead of the chair in debate, or, in a single instance, failing to confine his remarks to the merits of the pending question – the chair simply raps lightly, points out the fault, and advises the member to avoid it. The member can continue speaking if he commits no further breaches. RONR (11th ed.), p. 645 ll. 21 - 28

 

  • When a member thinks that the rules of the assembly are being violated, s/he can make a Point of Order (or “raise a question of order” as it is sometimes expressed), thereby calling upon the chair for a ruling and an enforcement of the regular rules. RONR (11th ed.), p. 247 ll. 1- 7


  • When a point of order is raised, the chair must stop the speaker or stop the process of the meeting and deal with the point of order immediately.  RONR (11th ed.), p. 249 ll. 32 - 35

  •  If the offense is more serious as when a member repeatedly questions the motives of other members whom he mentions by name, or persists in speaking on completely irrelevant matters in debate – the chair or any other member can “call the member to order”. RONR (11th ed.), p. 645 - 646 ll. 30 - 4

  •  The chair should clearly state the breach involved and put the question to the assembly: “Shall the member be allowed to continue speaking?” This question is undebatable. RONR (11th ed.). pp. 645 - 646 ll. 22 – 15.

 

  • Raise a Question of Privilege.  If a pressing situation is affecting a right or privilege of the assembly or of an individual member (for example, noise, inadequate ventilation, introduction of a confidential subject in the in the presence of guests, etc.), a member can Raise a Question of Privilege, which permits him/her to interrupt pending business to state an urgent request or motion. If the matter is not simple enough to be taken care of informally, the chair then makes a ruling as to whether it is admitted as a question of privilege and whether it requires consideration before the pending business is resumed. RONR (11th ed.). P.67, ll. 22-32.